Why Walk?

Over 26 million Americans–that’s 1 in 9 adults–have chronic kidney disease, and most are not aware of it. Because symptoms may not appear until the kidneys are actually failing, millions of people with kidney damage remain unaware and are not taking steps to protect the health of their kidneys

This is why we walk:

  • We walk for the 26 million Americans have chronic kidney disease (CKD) and millions more are at risk.
  • We walk to bring awareness to kidney disease – a common, harmful and treatable disease.
  • We walk for the 112,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure each year. That’s one person every five minutes.
  • We walk for the more than 547,000 people in the U.S. are receiving treatment for kidney failure. Patients with failed kidneys need dialysis or a kidney transplant to stay alive.
  • We walk for the 382,000 who currently depend on dialysis to stay alive.
  • We walk for the 88,000 are on the waiting list for a kidney transplant.
  • We walk for African Americans, Latinos, Asians, Native Americans and the elderly are at increased risk for kidney disease.
  • We walk to make people aware that the leading risk factors include high blood pressure, diabetes and family history.
  • We walk to ensure people receive early detection and proper treatment can slow the progress of kidney disease.

Why do you walk? We want to hear why you are so committed to the National Kidney Foundation and the fight against kidney disease.  We look forward to hearing your story on Facebook, our Blog and better yet…your personal fundraising page! To sign up visit, www.kidneywalk.org.

Remember to ‘like’ us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @NKF #kidneywalk.

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